Friday, July 24, 2009

Creativity and Spirituality

I love this and wanted to share it with some of you who are very special to me. It happens that I was looking for a quote on children and art (by Picasso-and I found it) but I also found this quote by one of my favorite authors. I hope you find it as special and heart-touching as I did. I do not claim credit for writing this. I am only sharing it. If the author wishes it removed, I will do so if the author lets me know. (I sadly can't give the author credit as I don't know who it is.) I don't mean to offend anyone who doesn't believe as I do. If you are offended,I am truly sorry.


Madeline L'Engle is the Christian author of a Newberry Award Winning children's novel entitled A Wrinkle in Time. In her book, Walking on Water, Madeline explores the connection between creativity, and spirituality.
"In prayer," Ms. L'Engle says, "as in the creative process, these two parts of ourselves, the mind and the heart, the intellect and the intuition, the conscious and the subconscious mind, stop fighting each other and collaborate. God is constantly creating, in us, through us, with us, and to co-create with God is our human calling."
I believe that! In a way, we are all artists. It doesn't matter what our medium is. Creativity exists for the gardener and the cook, as much as it does for the painter, musician, or writer. The process of making art, at its best, takes on the quality of prayer. Creativity is a spiritual experience. We lose track of time. We feel the power from God that is greater than ourselves. It is a labor of love.

A poster in an Oak Hill art classroom reads, "A man who works with his hands is a laborer, a man who works with his hands and his mind, is a craftsman, and a man who works with his hands, his mind and his heart, is an artist."
As artists we strive to put our every day selves aside and listen closely to the heart. Then, and only then, can the unseen part of ourselves become manifest in our work, and the work take on a life of its own. How can art take on a life of its own? It's a mystery, but it happens. Through regular practice, and a willingness to let go of the need for absolute control at all times.
Being a beginner as an adult can be intimidating. Maybe you're an engineer, or an architect, a lawyer, or a dentist. You dream of doing something more creative, but you're afraid your beginning work might look a bit childish. Consider the words of Pablo Picasso who said, "All children are artists, the trick is to remain artists when we grow up." Notice Picasso's work becomes more childlike as he advances in years.
Scripture tells us to retain our childlike qualities. Although Matthew 18:3 is not specific, we often consider those qualities of which Jesus spoke, and try to cultivate them in our Christian lives. Spontaneity, compassion, trust, and love are all positive childlike qualities; so too, is creativity.

9 comments:

Serena said...

beautiful Gene! Truly beautiful!

Pat said...

What a wonderful post, Gene. Thanks for sharing that!!!

Barb said...

Thank you, enjoyed that!!!

ooglebloops said...

Love this!I have that Picasso quote on one of my blog posts somewhere............

tango's trash & treasures said...

Wow is that awesome!!
Thank you for sharing!

Angie in AZ said...

GREAT post! Love it! Thanks for sharing.

karenfae said...

I like the "all children are artist" quote. yes the trick is to remain artist when we grow up. It took me awhile to realize it was ok to be an "artist" of a type when I grew up. I also though artist meant oil painter for some reason - only when I was an adult did I realize "artist" could mean "quilter" also.
Karen
http://karensquilting.com/blog/

Linda B said...

Thank you for sharing that with us. I have had a hard time ackowledging myself as an "artist", only getting truly started in my 50's. This has opened my heart, and I felt real joy in reading it. Anyone who creates is an artist. A big HUG to you.

LynnS said...

Really nice post....a great way to begin a new day. Thank you for this one, Gene.